Increase Your Students' Retention of Content!

This means we can engage students better with visuals like the ones found in Pixanotes!



Has this ever happened to you?

You've made a detailed anchor chart full of critical information with your Middle School students, asked some killer questions, and received spot-on answers.  Then, the next day, no one knows what you're talking about from yesterday!


Pixanotes can help to increase students' memory of important concepts!

How is this possible?!

 Dr. Kouyoumdjian says that research has proven that pictures increase comprehension and retention of information because our brains are primarily image processors as opposed to word processors.  

Ah ha!  So all those words on the chart and all that talking were not playing to our brain's strengths!  In fact, when I think about it, I know I spent many an hour studying vocabulary words in high school and college, but I would be hard pressed to remember them as well as the day I received my driver's license!

In fact, in one study that Dr. Kouyoumdjian cited, students were asked to memorize a list of three words.  Those subjects that associated the words with visuals remembered more words that the subjects who just tried to repeat the words over and over.  

This has fantastic implications for our students!  As teachers, we have known that pictures can de-mystify concepts, but did you realize how much more retention visuals can create?  

This is the research behind Pixanotes!!  Did you know that research has proven that visuals decrease learning time and increase comprehension and recall?
Source


As I was thinking about how I could harness the power of visuals in learning, Pixanotes was born!

Pixanotes are a blend of regular two-column notes and interactive notebooks with fill-in-the-blanks (or fully printed content) on the right and pictures (pre-printed or on flaps) to illustrate key ideas on the left.


Pixanotes help students record critical content and have pictures to boost recall!


In paper form, students can cut out the picture flaps and place them on the left to match the content for a more interactive notebook experience.  Later, students can write signal questions under the flaps for a more full Cornell notes type experience.

Or students can work with the Pixanotes that have pre-printed pictures since Pixanotes are fully differentiated too!  They come in four formats including:

★ Pre-printed Pictures and no blanks (highest level of structure)
★No pre-printed pictures and no blanks (moderate level of structure)
★ Pre-printed pictures with blanks (moderate level of structure)

★ No pre-printed pictures with blanks (lowest level of structure)

Each format has the same information so you could have 4 versions of Pixanotes out in your class at the same time.  This is perfect for students who have learning challenges or who have limited English proficiency.
Get a free copy of Pixanotes!
Any way you go, you'll find that students experience more success with Pixanotes because there are more cues for them to use to retain content!

 Get a free sample of the Pixanotes title referenced here AND SEE how to use them by clicking here!




There's also a digital version that can be accessed on any device that can connect to the internet!  There are movable text boxes and pictures for students to interact with the content.

Students remember more with visuals like those found in DIGITAL Pixanotes!


You can get even more FREE Pixanotes below:






Thanks for stopping by!

4 comments

  1. oh my! THIS is one of the best things I've seen in a long time! Keep cranking these out!

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    1. Thanks so much, Theresa! I am working on some Argumentative Essay Pixanotes next and would be happy to hear any requests! :)

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  2. I absolutely love this idea! I have had my students draw quick pictures to associate with vocabulary words, but I love the idea of the flap! Also, brain research always fascinates me, so I really appreciated the review of Dr. K's studies! Thanks, Lisa!

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    1. Thank you, Deb! Brain research fascinates me too and this was an ah-ha moment for me. :)

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