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Grit in the ELA Classroom with #2ndaryELA

Join secondary English Language Arts teachers Tuesday evenings at 8 pm EST on Twitter. This week's chat will be about a grit in the ELA classroom.
Brynn Allison, The Literary Maven, & Lisa Spangler, Mrs. Spangler in the Middle, host #2ndaryELA on Twitter every Tuesday evening from 8 - 8:30 PM EST. #2ndaryELA is a weekly chat for secondary English Language Arts teachers focused on a topic. Every Sunday, we post the topic and questions on our blogs to allow you to prepare for the upcoming Tuesday evening's chat. Thank you to everyone who joined us last week and we hope that you will join us again.

We'd also love for you to join our 2ndaryELA Facebook group, even if you aren't on Twitter. 2ndaryELA is a group of middle and high school English Language Arts teachers looking to share ideas and best practices. This group is an extension of our Twitter chat and a place for collaboration, questions, and encouragement. Feel free to post teaching ideas, success stories, resource links, photos, etc. that will enhance our instruction.

On Tuesday, November 13, our #2ndaryELA chat will be about grit in the ELA classroom.

Join secondary English Language Arts teachers Tuesday evenings at 8 pm EST on Twitter. This week's chat will be about a grit in the ELA classroom.

The Directions:
1. Log into Twitter on Tuesday from 8-8:30 PM EST.
2. Search for tweets with the hashtag #2ndaryELA in the search bar. Make sure to click “Latest.”
3. Introductions are for the first 5 minutes.
4. Starting at 8:05 (@literarymaven or @2peasandadog) will post questions every 5 minutes using the format Q1, Q2, Q3, etc. and the hashtag #2ndaryELA.
5. Respond to questions using the format A1, A2, A3, etc. with #2ndaryELA.
6. Follow any teachers responding and who are also using #2ndaryELA.
7. Like and respond to other teachers' tweets.

You can schedule your responses to the questions ahead of time using a scheduler like TweetDeck or HootSuite (but don't forget to use A1, A2, etc. and #2ndaryELA). Links are encouraged, so be sure to use a link shortener like tinyurlbitlygoo.gl or ow.ly Just visit one of those links and paste your long link to shorten it for Twitter. Using images is also encouraged when relevant.

New to chats? Here are the rules:
1. Stay on topic & stay positive!
2. Please do not post or promote paid products unless specifically asked.
3. If you arrive late, try to look through other posts before beginning.
4. Feel free to just read, like, and/or retweet.
5. Always use our hashtag #2ndaryELA, including in your replies to others.
6. Make sure your twitter feed is set to public. (Also keep in mind that Twitter is completely public – that means students, parents, and administrators can and will read what you tweet.)

You can also check out a quick video tutorial in this blog post.

Be sure to spread the word to any teacher friends who might be interested in joining us as well. We look forward to chatting with you Tuesday evening and in our 2ndaryELA Facebook group!

Get caught up on past chats here:

A Teacher's Professional Life with #2ndaryELA

Brynn Allison, The Literary Maven, & Lisa Spangler, Mrs. Spangler in the Middle, host #2ndaryELA on Twitter every Tuesday evening from 8 - 8:30 PM EST. #2ndaryELA is a weekly chat for secondary English Language Arts teachers focused on a topic. Every Sunday, we post the topic and questions on our blogs to allow you to prepare for the upcoming Tuesday evening's chat. Thank you to everyone who joined us last week and we hope that you will join us again.

We'd also love for you to join our 2ndaryELA Facebook group, even if you aren't on Twitter. 2ndaryELA is a group of middle and high school English Language Arts teachers looking to share ideas and best practices. This group is an extension of our Twitter chat and a place for collaboration, questions, and encouragement. Feel free to post teaching ideas, success stories, resource links, photos, etc. that will enhance our instruction.

On Tuesday, November 6, our #2ndaryELA chat will be about a teacher's professional life.

Join secondary English Language Arts teachers Tuesday evenings at 8 pm EST on Twitter. This week's chat will be about a teacher's professional life.

The Directions:
1. Log into Twitter on Tuesday from 8-8:30 PM EST.
2. Search for tweets with the hashtag #2ndaryELA in the search bar. Make sure to click “Latest.”
3. Introductions are for the first 5 minutes.
4. Starting at 8:05 (@literarymaven or @2peasandadog) will post questions every 5 minutes using the format Q1, Q2, Q3, etc. and the hashtag #2ndaryELA.
5. Respond to questions using the format A1, A2, A3, etc. with #2ndaryELA.
6. Follow any teachers responding and who are also using #2ndaryELA.
7. Like and respond to other teachers' tweets.

You can schedule your responses to the questions ahead of time using a scheduler like TweetDeck or HootSuite (but don't forget to use A1, A2, etc. and #2ndaryELA). Links are encouraged, so be sure to use a link shortener like tinyurlbitlygoo.gl or ow.ly Just visit one of those links and paste your long link to shorten it for Twitter. Using images is also encouraged when relevant.

New to chats? Here are the rules:
1. Stay on topic & stay positive!
2. Please do not post or promote paid products unless specifically asked.
3. If you arrive late, try to look through other posts before beginning.
4. Feel free to just read, like, and/or retweet.
5. Always use our hashtag #2ndaryELA, including in your replies to others.
6. Make sure your twitter feed is set to public. (Also keep in mind that Twitter is completely public – that means students, parents, and administrators can and will read what you tweet.)

You can also check out a quick video tutorial in this blog post.

Be sure to spread the word to any teacher friends who might be interested in joining us as well. We look forward to chatting with you Tuesday evening and in our 2ndaryELA Facebook group!

Get caught up on past chats here:

Strategies & Methods for Note Taking


Middle and High School Note Taking Tips To Make Teaching Easier!  #methods #strategies


Sketch notes?  Doodle notes?  Cornell notes?  Pixanotes?
Which notes are right for your classroom?
Why do students even take notes?
And how can notes be differentiated?

I think you'll find that the #2ndaryELA nation tackled this and more in our Twitter chat about Note Taking.




Q1: Do you think secondary students need to take notes? Why or why not?
A1: I honestly believe students need to learn to take notes! Both during lecture and from informational texts. Secondary education is so innovative, but higher education is still based on lecture!
A1: Personally I do think Ss need to take notes. BUT I do not think they always have to be from a lecture. Without notes, how can they study? How can parents know how to help?
I think some note taking is fine as long as it is not all class time and/or every day.
A1: I think it depends on the nature of the class and the learning style of the student. I think giving students the option to is a good idea in general, and then if there is something of significance you want them to remember then you could have them take notes.
A1: Yes, notes need to be explicitly taught to secondary students! It is an important skill that is applicable to all subjects and other life areas as well.
Yes, note taking is essential for college bound students - but for just learning material in HS... not sure it is. College is just so old school while HS is always changing.. hard to stay on the same page!
Q2: What types of notes do you use in your classroom?
A2 I use an interactive notebook for notes and also traditional notes.
Replying to 
A2: I use a lot of resources over old school ppt notes.. if anything, I have the kids write annotations. When I was in school, outlining was king - but now, outlines are like ðŸĶ–s
A2: Cornell notes, double-entry journals, guided notes (words and pictures), brainstorm activities, chapter notes, annotations on text, etc. The style of notes depends on the purpose for the note-taking and even the preference of the student when appropriate.
A2: I know that sketch/doodle notes are all the rage, but ironically my ADHD Ss do not like them. My more logical thinkers do, however. Both groups liked my picture notes because of the blend.
Replying to 
In science and history, I can see the importance of notes - but with literary elements and devices, finding and using them are paramount
Replying to 
I think of the notes as resources and I agree that using them is the key. I personally don't have my Ss just copy anything.
Hmm... I believe it's both. ELA notes should include examples that can later be used as resources. In class notes, I embed examples
Yes embedding is good. I just know there’s research out there now that states old school note taking isn’t as beneficial anymore due to Ss’ attention spans
Of course my principal would say that notes are a "Teachable moment" in terms of stamina and increasing student attention spans. :)
I'd agree with your principal; especially, for students who are intending to go to traditional colleges. Outside of Ed classes, lecture is happening at the collegiate level.
You're right of course and we could build them up one chunk at a time until they have more stamina for a longer attention span.
A2: I am a fan of Cornell Notes but Interactive notes are great too! I combined the two and made my own Pixanotes - picture notes. :)
Q3: What do students use their notes for in your classroom or at home?
A3: In class, they are used as reference material for assignments. (Think personal anchor charts) At home they are used as study materials.
Replying to 
A3: Each S has a binder that has a resources section where all handouts and notes go for HW assignments and compositions. I’m not a fan of HW in its purest form - just reading. Read outside of class to lead to in class discussions.
A3: Notes in my class are mostly about concepts and students use these throughout units. At the beginning of a unit on social commentary in dystopian literature, students took notes on the concept and used it throughout the unit.
A3: Notes may be used on many assessments, during presentations, as study guides, for partner talk, reference during games/quizzes - Pretty much anything!
Q4: Do you differentiate notes in your class and/or allow students to develop their own style?
Replying to 
A4: My HS is 100% into Collins Writing and using very structured lessons ie the kids basically see the lesson plan in front of them... so annotations is key
Replying to 
Collins Writing uses Focus Content Areas (FCAs) instead of grading everything. So, you assign 3 things that you’re looking for and you don’t change them until everyone perfects an FCA.
A4: My picture notes are differentiated 4 ways - all the same content just diff. scaffolding. So I could have all 4 versions out in the same class at the same time.
I should add that these are guided notes with images and examples.
I modified Cornell notes to help my ELL and SPED Ss.
A4: Both, And. I have a large amount of ELL students and students who are multiple grade levels behind, so I change notes for these students. I do guided notes and provide it where they get to fill-in-the-blank.
A4: Students are allowed to draw pictures, doodle notes, copy, and use technology to record notes – whatever works best for them. The only time I use a required type of notes is when I am teaching the actual skill.
Q5: Share your best note-taking resources.
Cornell notes are very popular with AVID programs.
AVID? is a master at Cornell notetaking!!
I'd love to see this! I'm considering Cornell notes, but I've never used them.
AVID is a middle school program to help Ss who want to go to college but need a little extra support. I will have to follow ! :)
Replying to   and 
AVID is not just middle school - many high schools have AVID programs as well.
A5: The best resource I use is the Cornell Notes style. For students who prefer digital notes, I typically let them use whatever app they like. I am open to more resources though!
Remember, we keep the conversation going all the time at our Facebook group and we'd love for you to join the almost 20,000 other Secondary ELA teachers in our community!

Thanks for stopping by!